Dermatologic Center for Excellence
9276 Main Street, Ste 1A / Clarence, NY 14031

Monday - Thursday 7:00 am - 5:00 pm

(716) 636-DERM (3376)

Diabetes-Related Skin Conditions

Our team of professionals and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well-being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you.

Patient General Forms

Please note there has been a recent change to our Financial Policy (effective 1/13/2020).

We now require a Credit Card to be kept on file for all patients. If you have questions in regards to this policy, please take the time to read the FAQs Regarding the Credit Card on File Agreement found below as to why we have made this change.

Patient Care Instructions Forms

 

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding the Credit Card on File Agreement

Do I have to leave my credit card information to be a patient at this practice?

Yes. This is our policy and it is a growing trend in the healthcare industry. Insurance reimbursements are declining and there has been a large increase in patient deductibles. These factors are driving offices to either squeeze more patients into shorter periods of time or to stop accepting insurance. We have decided to focus on becoming more efficient in our billing and collections processes instead.

How much and when will money be taken from my account?

The insurance companies on average take approximately 2-4 weeks to process submitted claims. Whatever the allowed amount is, your copay, coinsurance, and deductible are taken into consideration. It simply depends on your individual policy what you may owe. Once the insurance explanation of benefits is received and posted to your account, you will be sent a statement showing your portion. You will have 30 days to send an alternative form of payment if you prefer. If no alternative payment is received, your patient financial responsibility will be processed. Please Note: If your card is denied, a $10 late fee will be added each month following, until the balance is paid, as noted in our financial policy.

How do you safeguard the credit information you keep on file?

We use the same methods to guard your credit card information as we do for your medical information. The card information is securely protected by the credit card processing component of our HIPAA compliant practice management system and credit card manager. This system stores the card information for future transactions using the same sort of technology that any online retailer would. We can’t see the card number – only the last four numbers, giving us no way to use the card outside of the billing system. There is no way to export the card information out of our system.

What are the benefits?

It saves you time and eliminates the need to write checks, buy stamps or worry about delays in the mail. It also drives our administrative costs down because our staff sends out fewer statements and spends less time taking credit card information over the phone or entering it from the billing slips sent in the mail, which are less secure methods than us storing the information. The extra time the staff has can now be spent on directly helping the patients, either over the phone, with insurance claims or in person.

I always pay my bills on time. Why do I have to do this?

The entire billing process is time consuming and wasteful, and the few patients that we do have to send to a collection agency end up costing a lot of money. Reducing unnecessary costs are essential to allowing us to continue to be an in-network provider with most insurance companies. Nothing is changing about how much you end up paying.

What if there is a payment discrepancy or I have other payment questions?

Please contact our billing department directly to settle payment discrepancies or for other payment questions. This policy in no way compromises your ability to dispute a charge or questions your insurance company’s explanation of benefits.

Will I still receive a paper bill by mail?

Yes. You will receive one bill which will show what will be charged to your card in 30 days. If you prefer to pay by an alternative method, you may do so during that period. If you do not wish to make any payment method changes, just hold onto the statement for your records and your card will be charged.

 

 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

It is estimated that about one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder at some time in their lives caused by the disease. Diabetics are more susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections; allergic reactions to medications, insect bites or foods; dry itchy skin as a result of poor blood circulation; and infections from foot injuries for people with neuropathy.

There are a number of diabetes-specific skin conditions:

Acanthosis Nigricans. A slowly progressing skin condition, which turns some areas of skin, usually in the folds or creases, into dark, thick and velvet-textured skin. Acanthosis nigricans often precedes the diagnosis of diabetes. It is sometimes inherited, but is usually triggered by high insulin levels. It can occur at any age and usually strikes people who are obese. There is no treatment for the condition except to reduce insulin levels. Prescription creams may help lighten the affected area.

Diabetic Blisters. Rare blisters that appear on the hands, toes, feet or forearms that are thought to be caused by diabetic neuropathy.

Diabetic Dermopathy. Round, brown or purple scaly patches that most frequently appear on the front of the legs (most often the shins) and look like age spots. They are caused by changes in small blood vessels. Diabetic dermopathy occurs more often in people who have suffered from diabetes for decades. They are harmless, requiring no medical intervention, but they are slow to heal.

Digital Sclerosis. This condition appears as thick, waxy and tight skin on toes, fingers and hands, which can cause stiffness in the digits. Getting blood glucose levels back to normal helps alleviate this skin condition.

Disseminated Granuloma Annulare. A red or reddish-brown rash that forms a bull's eye on the skin, usually on the fingers, toes or ears. While not serious, it is advised that you talk to your dermatologist about taking steroid medications to make the rash go away.

Eruptive Xanthomatosis. A pea-like enlargement in the skin with a red halo that itches. It most frequently appears on the hands, feet, arms, legs or buttocks. It is often a response to high triglycerides. Keeping blood glucose levels in the normal range helps this condition subside.

Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum. This condition is similar to diabetic dermopathy, but the spots are larger, fewer, deeper in the skin and have a shiny porcelain-like appearance. It is often itchy or painful. It goes through cycles of being active and inactive. It is caused by changes in collagen and fat underneath the skin. Women are three times more likely to get this condition than are men. Typically, topical steroids are used to treat necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum. In more severe cases, cortisone injections may be required.

Vitiligo. Vitiligo refers to the development of white patches anywhere on the skin. It usually affects areas of skin that have been exposed to sun. It also appears in body folds, near moles or at the site of previous skin injury. The condition is permanent and there is no known cure or prevention. However, there are some treatments that can be used to improve the appearance of the skin, such as steroid creams and ultraviolet light therapy.